Dr Georgina Pearson is a Lecturer in the Institute of Global Health and Development.

  • Overview
  • Research Interests
  • Research Publications
  • Funded Projects
  • Teaching & Learning

Georgina Pearson is a medical doctor and medical anthropologist by training, with experience in interdisciplinary approaches to research and teaching across biomedical and social sciences. Investigating global health priorities from an interdisciplinary, biosocial perspective, her main scholarly interests broadly include: methods and ethics in health research; and local understandings of health, illness, disease and public health interventions, particularly among fishing populations. Georgina’s PhD was based on long-term ethnographic fieldwork and epidemiological study exploring everyday realities of neglected diseases (schistosomiasis, Buruli ulcer and hepatitis) and their control among fishermen and women in northwestern Uganda.

Before joining IGHD in 2019, Georgina was a Lecturer in Public Health at St George’s, University of London, and a Research Fellow in the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, London School of Economics, where she continues to collaborate on research projects as a Visiting Fellow.  

Georgina has an undergraduate medical degree (MBChB) from the University of Birmingham, a Masters in Medical Anthropology from Brunel University and a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science (Department of International Development). She holds Diplomate Membership of the UK Faculty of Public Health of the Royal College of Physicians, and is a Fellow of the Higher Education Academy.

Affiliations/Memberships to Other Organisations:

  • Honorary Lecturer, Population Health Research Institute, St George’s, University of London
  • Visiting Research Fellow, Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa, London School of Economics and Political Science
  • Fellow of The Higher Education Academy, UK
  • Diplomate member of the UK Faculty of Public Health

Professional Social Media:

Investigating global health priorities from an interdisciplinary perspective, my research interests include: methods and ethics in health research; and local understandings of health, illness, disease and public health interventions, particularly among marginalised populations.  I have undertaken long-term ethnographic fieldwork and epidemiological study, exploring everyday realities of neglected diseases (schistosomiasis, Buruli ulcer and hepatitis) and their control among fishermen and women in northwestern Uganda. I am currently involved in two research projects, one, Localised Evidence and Decision-making in global health programmes, which uses Participatory Systems Mapping to explore and incorporate national and district level public health practitioners’ perspectives on implementing public health programmes in selected sub-Saharan African countries. The second research project, ‘Living the Everyday: Health-seeking in times of sickness and epidemics at Uganda's borders’, addresses how social relations and everyday life affect knowledge and the management of sickness.

Active Research Interests:

  • Anthropology of public health
  • Understandings of affliction and health-seeking
  • Neglected diseases
  • Fishing livelihoods
  • Public health interventions

Research Methods:

  • Ethnography
  • Epidemiology
  • Qualitative
  • Mixed methods

Please see my research publications in eResearch – Queen Margaret University’s repository

2019-2021:

  • I am a research fellow on the Localised Evidence and Decision-making (LEAD) project, which seeks to address the need for locally-relevant evidence in public health decision-making.  LEAD is hosted by LSE’s Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa in partnership with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and funded by the Bloomsbury SET (Science, Economics, Technology) programme.
  • I am co-investigator on ‘Living the Everyday: exploring health-seeking in times of sickness and epidemics at Uganda's borders’, which, based in the West Nile sub-region of northwest Uganda, addresses how social relations and everyday life affect knowledge and the management of sickness. Hosted by LSE’s Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa in partnership with Muni University and the University of Gulu, Uganda, and funded by The British Academy’s Knowledge Frontiers: International Interdisciplinary Research Projects 2019 programme.

I coordinate the Sexual and Reproductive Health module and contribute to modules in IGHD on research ethics and methods (particularly qualitative methods). With experience of teaching in biomedical and social science programmes, I bring an interdisciplinary approach to my teaching and curriculum design, and aim to encourage students to engage critically with subjects from different perspectives.