Hometown: Glasgow, Scotland

 

About You:

After graduating from the University of Glasgow in 2010 with a degree in English Literature and Spanish, I was initially interested in editorial and language work and was lucky enough to find a job working as a subtitler for some of the UK’s main broadcasters, including the BBC and Channel 4.

Whilst enjoying the challenges of a fast-paced, stimulating media environment, I had always felt drawn to a more vocational career path and a job which might take me away from the computer and back towards working with people.

Having learned the piano and oboe in my school years, and sung and played in many different choirs, orchestras, chamber groups and ska bands, to name a few, music was again becoming an increasingly important aspect of my life. I had been focusing more and more on songwriting, which culminated in a recording project involving several different musicians. I felt I was returning to my first love – music.

One day, whilst sitting in the kitchen at work, I came across an advert in a newspaper with a course advertised on it as “Music Therapy”. I was immediately intrigued, and researched as much as possible about what music therapy was and how you might set about becoming a music therapist. There was something about the idea of the innate musicality of every person which rang true with me, and I felt a strong sense that this could be the right “fit” for me.

I discovered the only place in Scotland offering music therapy was Queen Margaret University. I was almost certain I did not have the right background or qualifications – no music degree, little practical experience – however, I received encouragement to apply from the programme leader at QMU and another music therapist who kindly met with me to discuss the course and the profession.

"The course offered a great balance between the study of theory, practical learning on placement, and experiential learning. While juggling these different aspects could at times feel challenging, it made for a rich and dynamic training that I believe has prepared me well for beginning work as a qualified music therapist."
Laura Corrigan

After gaining invaluable experience working with a community musician and returning to study the piano, I applied and was delighted to be accepted to the MSc in Music Therapy at QMU. From the first day, it felt wonderful to get to know the music therapy room and explore the fantastic instruments. The small number of students on the course meant we were each able to benefit from a high level of teaching input and support from our lecturers. This was a welcome change to my undergraduate experience, where I had often felt isolated and just another number.

The variety of placements on offer over the two years provided an opportunity to branch out and gain experience in new areas. I was fortunate enough to be able to work in two very different settings: a school for children with additional support needs and a low-secure psychiatric hospital. The diversity of challenges and needs unique to each client group and setting opened up new ways of thinking about and practising music therapy, about different approaches and about what could be achieved for each individual.

The course offered a great balance between the study of theory, practical learning on placement, and experiential learning. While juggling these different aspects could at times feel challenging, it made for a rich and dynamic training that I believe has prepared me well for beginning work as a qualified music therapist.

My journey through the course has been one of both professional and personal development, and I feel lucky to have benefited from an ethos which encourages and supports each student in exploring and discovering their unique identity as a music therapist.

Music Therapy

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